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Archive for the ‘Homer’ Category

Big City

Zach, Judah and I have been in Anchorage this week – luckily enough our trip coincided with an Andy Warhol exhibit at the Anchorage museum. Aside from an interesting but unfortunate mishap, about which I don’t think I can speak of on such a public forum, the museum trip was a giant success. I was excited to view Art that did not fall under the exclusive title of Alaskan Landscapes and Judah loved the children’s portion of the Warhol exhibit, which included about 50 pairs of sunglasses for trying on.

And! Judah and her little Homer friends were extra pleased to visit the Imaginarium. Who knew Anchorage could be such a good time?

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Snowy Day

Hurray, there is snow and definitive signs of winter-time in Homer! Judah, Amesa, Blaster and I are excited about playing outside in the snow. I’m afraid that Zach Brown is slightly less enthusiastic about working outside in the snow, perhaps because he does not have frequent indoor interludes of snack time, story time, nap time, 4pm glass of wine time, etc.

The one major drawback of winter in Judah’s mind seems to be the absence of berries growing on the once prosperous bushes. And alas, she believes this to be her own fault and is now bemoaning her lack of foresight…”Oh bother! Judah eat ALL the berries. Should have saved some”! (Although we did save some and they are in the freezer…)

Now that mitten season is unarguably present, Judah insists on wearing her mittens at all times. She wore them to bed last night – they stayed on until morning and she is now wearing a different pair while napping.

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Summer is drawing to a close in this hemisphere, although in Homer, Alaska it feels as though summer is just now on it’s way in… this past week’s weather has been the nicest since April! I’m quite excited for Winter; it’s a fun season and I love the natural transitions from Summer to Autumn and how by mid-Winter, all people can think about is the imminent arrival of Springtime.

Autumn Smiles...

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This blog is being completely infiltrated by my school assignments. Thats my disclaimer. We are also embarking upon Sexual Assault Awareness Month, which I have written about before. Thats my other disclaimer.

Two Ways a Woman Can Get Hurt is an essay written by Jean Kilbourne. It documents a recent history of sexism and blatant oppression and objectification of women in the media; in advertising, specifically. For instance, an ad for shaving gel depicts a picture of a nice looking man on the left with the word “heartbreak” under his photo and a razor on the right with the phrase, “soap and water shave”. The enlarged and catchy text is where the essay derives its title, “Two Ways A Woman Can Get Hurt”. The article suggests that a man = inevitable pain for women, comparative of a bad shaving job which also inevitably inflicts physical injury. The implications of this advertisement are huge and multifaceted…the fact that so many of these sexist dominated ads are for products that invariably subject women to male superiority and preference is telling in and of itself. Alcohol is strongly implicated in (although not responsible for) many assault cases with female victims and male batterers, and is marketed by heavy sexism. Shaving products? Really? While women have historically made valiant attempts to rid themselves of bodily hair, one might question, why? Why the effort? The cost? At this point in time, I believe it is safe to say, there is a standard of beauty and it includes hairless women. One must not offend the men that hold women to that standard.

I find the aforementioned image illuminating. We live in a society that is heavy with heterosexual priviledge and gender entitlements. Of course advertising reflects that. I also don’t think that any of us can expect corporate media to advocate peace in the way of freedom from the oppression of society and domestic violence and sexual assault and whatever it looks like to specific people who might not include themselves as victims under these labels.

And…if you live in Homer or thereabouts, you should definitely attend Stand Up For Peace which is one step towards cultivating awareness of the problems to which we seek solutions.

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So, I take Judah to alot of playgroups. Homer is a nice little town and rates highly in the ‘fun activities for babies’ criteria…I hear that Bethel is really lacking playgroups (but I actually have friends there) and while Fairbanks has it’s own share of baby oriented events (and friends), I would have to, you know, drive alot further to reach them. I certainly would not walk to them. Thus, Homer wins out again, I suppose. The thing is though, people overhear me at these playgroups asking Judah if she needs to use the bathroom and they look at me in a strange manner and ask me if she is potty trained. This provokes eye rolling on my part, as the answer is complicated and if I go into it attempting to explain, they will think I’m crazy and probably won’t even believe me, so the question leaves me at a loss for an answer.

I’m sure I have mentioned this before, when I tell people about elimination communication, they think I’m nuts. They tell me it does not work. (Oh, really?) They say it’s terribly hard. Gross. Complicated. Biologically impossible. I just really don’t understand, I mean, what is not to embrace about not changing diapers?

So anyway, the ridiculous thing is that I am in the midst of writing an (overdue) essay about elimination communication for my English class. Perhaps I shall begin passing my Finished Product out to those who question me regarding Judah’s “elimination” habits. I suppose our playgroups provide a general demographic of people who represent the targeted audience of my argument. Perhaps my essay with it’s strong thesis and several supporting reasons would succeed at convincing individuals of what is apparently biological normal anyway. But wouldn’t the cost effectiveness be a convincing factor in and of itself? For instance, imagine spending less than $200 on diapers (which are reusable even, as they are cloth!) for a child (such as i did…) as opposed to spending between $2,000 – $3,000 which is the average spent for conventionally potty trained and disposable diapered children. Or the environmental factor…no washing diapers, no diapers in the trash, but poo and pee in the potty, as a reasonable alternative! Or the convenience of the brilliant scheme! I have never packed around a diaper bag. Zach, (five month old) Judah and I were stranded in Anchorage once with no diapers of any kind, but as sense would dictate, we did have a tiny toilet for our small child, and she used it and never once had need of a diaper. In a similar situation, I was stranded at a conference in Girdwood once, for three days with (six month old) Judah sans diapers…we had one small pee incident. One!

The other ridiculous thing is, a lady followed me home in her car one day, yelling out of her window to me, “are you the one who potty trained her baby?” So I gave her a book about ec, called Diaper Free Baby by Christine Gross-Loh. The book is now in the process of being passed around to various pregnant women at the playgroup. Hopefully they will read it and learn.

It’s easy! It’s simple! I only wonder, why would someone choose not to practice ec?

I should add…I do have nice friends in Homer. But still, I resent the fact that most of the people  I know and love live in two far away destinations.

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Judah loves her mud boots. Luckily for Judah, she lives in Homer where it is perpetually rainy and thus muddy at all times. Even in February. There is apparently no non-rainy season in this region, which is fortunate for some (yuppies and Judah), as it rather necessitates mud boots. While I am convinced that soft soled shoes (especially ones handmade on etsy!) are much better than hard soled shoes for normal foot development…Judah does not care. She loves these boots. She really really loves her Xtra Tuffs (thanks, Drake), but they are much too large for her, and they make her fall. Alot. I had to hide them after she tumbled down the staircase while wearing them. But then she found them while I was at work, threw a tantrum and Zach was compelled to let her wear them again. Alas, they are still too big and are now concealed in a less accessible location. See how much she loves her boots?

And do you see this ridiculous face that Judah insists on making when I attempt to take her picture?

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Roy

There are alot of moose in Homer. There are alot of moose in Alaska. Judah has been spotting various moose recently and even having some close encounters with a few of them and she loves them. She knows what a moose “says”, she knows about their antlers and their velvety noses, she reads books about them and she calls them “Roy”. Roy. All of the collective moose are known as “Roy” in our house. It’s much simpler than giving them each their own name, I suppose, but it seems a bit silly. She is constantly yelling for the moose. It’s always, “Roy! ROY! RROOOYYYY!!” This morning as we were driving to work she was hollering for Roy. Lo and behold, can you guess who showed up outside of work today, to munch on the trees? Roy, himself. I imagine that it will take some time for her to realize that Roy is not exactly her friend in the way that say, our dogs are her friends. I mean, Roy is definitely her friend, but it’s just not quite the same. It’s still a little confusing to her (and to me!) why we can’t hang out with Roy on more of a personal level. Like today, for instance, when she wanted Roy to come inside and read a story with her. It was a story about moose, after all. It makes sense that we would include him.

Roy and some buds

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